N Korea fires 3 ballistic missiles; 'grave threat' says Japan

The UN Security Council will meet tomorrow morning in NY to consider a response to the latest missile launches by North Korea, diplomats said today. Submarine-based missiles could potentially put more of South Korea and Japan within the North's missile range and are harder than land-based missiles to detect before launch.

Pyongyang is barred from testing ballistic missiles under several United Nations resolutions and was hit with strengthened sanctions this year.

Yesterday on the sidelines of the summit, South Korean President Park Geun-hye criticised the North for what she called provocations that are hurting Seoul-Beijing ties.

North Korea fired three ballistic missiles which flew about 1,000km and landed in waters within Japan's exclusive economic zone west of Hokkaido yesterday, just as G-20 leaders wrapped up a summit in the eastern Chinese city of Hangzhou.

The 50-minute summit took place shortly after the two leaders arrived in the Laotian capital to attend a series of regional summits for the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean).

JetBlue mixup sends little boys to wrong families in wrong cities
JetBlue staffers presented Martinez with a different boy who was carrying her son's passport, according to the report. But after the mix-up, Andy ended up 214 miles away after another boy was mistakenly put on the plane to NY .


China has repeatedly expressed anger since the US and South Korea made a final decision in July to deploy the US Thaad system in the South to counter missile and nuclear threats from North Korea.

The stated objective of the THAAD system is to defend South Korea from missile attack from the North, but Beijing views it as an attempt to shift the regional power balance in favor of USA allies.

The North did not issue a no-fly, no-sail warning in the area. Both leaders suggested they would continue to push China, North Korea's only ally in the region, to use its influence to intervene. That progress was also displayed last month by the North's launch of submarine-based missiles. "So we have to be very vigilant in terms of enforcement and we have to maintain the sense of urgency among the global community", Rhodes said.

"Our commitment to the defense of our allies in the face of these threats remains ironclad", Kirby added in a reference to US treaty allies South Korea and Japan.

"If it is willing to recognize its global obligations and the importance of denuclearization in the Korean Peninsula, the opportunities for us to dialogue with them are there", he said. But more recent tests suggest North Korea is steadily learning from what appears to be a test-and-improve approach, Ms. Tomomi said.

  • Sonia Alvarado