Traffic study ranks Los Angeles as world's most clogged city

Los Angeles is perennial champion when it comes to the worst traffic congestion in the United States, but on a global scale the metro area has been beaten in the past by Istanbul, Mexico City and Bangkok. In the 2015 study, D.C. was ranked 40th in the world.

Being stuck in traffic cost the average US driver $1,400 past year, for an overall total of $300 billion nationwide, Inrix said.

That topped second-place Moscow at 91 hours and third-place NY at 89.

Seattle now joins cities like LA, New York and Miami in the top 10 most congested in the country, according to a study put out by Kirkland-based traffic group Inrix.

The capital is the second most congested city in Europe after Moscow, and is the seventh most gridlocked city on the planet.

However, when it came to listing the most congested countries in the world, Thailand came in fist place, with 61 hours of traffic per driver per year.

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NY and San Francisco also have badly clogged roads.

"A stable US economy, continued urbanization of major cities, and factors such as employment growth and low gas prices have all contributed to increased traffic in 2016". "Those kinds of factors, combined with an already strained road network leads to increased congestion". Drivers in L.A. spent 104 hours stuck in traffic during peak times past year, according to Inrix.

"This scorecard takes all roads into account to give a more accurate reflection of a the typical trip", says Inrix senior economist Bob Pishue.

The national average for sitting in traffic cost the average commuter $1,400 and almost $300 billion combined for all drivers in the United States, the study said.

And the time spent going nowhere costs the economy an estimated £30billion a year.

In his post, Cookson pointed to London as one of several cities that have used technology and sensors to improve traffic conditions.

  • Darren Santiago