Facebook Wants to Stop Revenge Porn

Facebook today introduced new tools created to help victims of so-called revenge porn.

This will be across Facebook, Messenger and Instagram, meaning your disgruntled ex will have no way of humiliating you with those private images again. "This is part of our ongoing effort to help build a safe community on and off Facebook", the company said.

A study from the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative found that 93 percent of revenge porn victims suffered major emotional distress, 51 percent had suicidal thoughts, and 49 percent reported being stalked or harassed by others who saw their non-consensual images online.

If the photo-matching tech finds a person re-sharing an image that has been previously reported and taken down, then they'll be alerted that their upload violates the company's policies and their attempt to share it will be stopped.

Davis said trained representatives from Facebook's Community Operations team will review the images and remove them if they are considering to be in violation of the social network's Community Standards.

Facebook will also use "photo-matching technologies" for pictures the site is already aware are being shared non-consensually. However, people have still managed to post and share intimate photos of others without their permission.

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The revenge-porn updates are the latest in a series of changes for the platform that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg laid out in his nine-zillion-word manifesto earlier this year.

Antigone Davis, Facebook's head of global safety, said the social media site will use the technology to increase security for users across its different apps.

"Revenge porn is any intimate photo shared without permission".

Facebook has pledged to stop revenge porn being published on its network, including Facebook itself, Instagram and Messenger.

To report a photo that might be considered "revenge porn", users can click on the ellipses icon next to a post and then "report".

Rep. Jackie Speier (D-Calif.), who's looking to push legislation against the dissemination of revenge porn, praised Facebook's initiative. They offer an appeals process if someone believes an image was taken down in error. If someone shares an image with you, you have no right to do anything with that.

  • Douglas Reid