The cup of coffee that could cause heart palpitations

The "world's strongest coffee" is now available in the United States, but just one cup could spill you over the daily caffeine limit.

Black Insomnia Coffee, first available in South Africa previous year, announced a deal with Amazon to bring its ultra-caffeinated beans to the US market. The FDA recommends a limit of 400 mg per day. Further, he notes that while developing his coffee, "any blend that resulted in a higher caffeine content than 702mg [per 12 ounces] adversely affected the flavor and thus was rejected".

If you're daring enough to give it a shot (pun intended), apparently Black Insomnia isn't all about caffeine. According to a press release, that makes the coffee 33 percent stronger than competitor - with a similarly ominous name - Deathwish Coffee.

Cape Town, South Africa-based Black Insomnia proudly acknowledges its product is in no way part of a healthy, balanced lifestyle.

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If your morning cup of Pike Place Roast isn't getting the job done, Black Insomnia coffee could be your key to an energized day. "The most serious effect would be cardiac arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat)", she said.

"Don't come crying to us if you can't handle the kick", the company's website reads, next to the promotional hashtag #sleepingischeating. Death Wish has 660 mg. "Our coffee is much different than the competition, due to the fact that our roast is USDA Certified Organic and Fair Trade Certified as well". Both types of coffees is available for sale on Amazon, which could not be reached for comment.

The Black Insomnia coffee became the "World's Strongest Coffee", according to its maker, when they went way beyond the caffeine levels that were set by the world's "now second strongest coffee". If caffeine is added separately, then the inclusion is necessary on the food product label.

Caffeine Informer's editor Ted Kallmyer places Black Insomnia on its list of the most risky caffeinated products.

  • Ismael Montgomery