Disney says hackers claim to have stolen upcoming movie

Although Disney CEO Bob Iger did not reveal the film that was claimed to be held by hackers, he did reveal to ABC employees during a town hall meeting in NY on Monday that the pilfering of the film definitely occurred.

CEO Bob Iger briefed employees at ABC Monday morning but didn't confirm if the Pirates film is at risk of being leaked.

The hackers have threatened to release the entire title in five minute snippets. and could follow through after Iger vowed Disney would not pay. Considering that film's release is many months away and the fact that Disney would probably pay anything to stop it from being leaked, it's safe to say that we're not talking about Star Wars here.

The unnamed group has demanded that Disney cough up a hefty ransom, to be paid through the cryptocurrency and digital payment system Bitcoin, in order to regain access to what's rightfully theirs.

In 2014 hackers paralysed Sony Pictures and demanded the studio cancel distribution of The Interview, a comedy about a plot to assassinate North Korea's leader, Kim Jong-un.

Colbert gleefully responds 'I won' to insults from Trump
The president also said that when he was on Colbert's show , "it was the highest ratings he ever had". Jon Stewart defended Colbert's " potty mouth " during a Daily Show reunion on Tuesday.


A few weeks ago online platforms were abuzz with the rumours of a working print of The Last Jedi being used for ransom but the chatter died down over the lack of comment from the studio or other confirming reports. However, an online chatter tipped that the rumor was a hoax. The show is officially set to be released on June 9.

"Who is next on the list?"

Hackers have also reportedly targeted Hollywood agencies such as UTA, ICM and WME. A spokesperson for the FBI Los Angeles office, Laura Eimiller denied that the agency is advising Hollywood firms to pay in cases of ransomware attacks.

The ransom business on the internet seems to be booming this week.

  • Darren Santiago