US Supreme Court to hear New Jersey sports betting appeal

The justices will review a federal appeals court's ruling past year that the 2014 New Jersey statute permitting sports betting at casinos and racetracks violated a 1992 federal law that prohibits such gambling in all states except Nevada, Delaware, Montana and Oregon. The latest measure repealed New Jersey's existing prohibition on sports gambling, though only at tracks and casinos. Earlier this year, National Football League owners allowed the Oakland Raiders to relocate to Las Vegas, a move that New Jersey gambling advocates and industry observers saw as a "symbolic breakthrough" for the push to legalize sports betting. New Jersey passed the second law in 2014, and a lower courts struck it down past year.

Legal sports gambling is allowed in Nevada and three other states that already had approved some form of wagering before the federal law went into effect. Industry groups estimate that billions of dollars are bet illegally on sports each year. Nevada is the only state that can offer betting on individual games.

The case will be heard when the Supreme Court enters its next term in October.

Christie weighed in on the issue Tuesday at an unrelated event in Trenton. "I'm feeling pretty good". They point to a 1992 Supreme Court decision that said the federal government may not "commandeer" a state's regulatory power.

New Jersey state Sen.

"These decisions should be made at the state level", said state Sen.

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This thinking reached its nadir at the St Andrews' Agreement, when a sectarian headcount at election time was entrenched in our devolved institutions.


The decision to take on the case reflects renewed energy among the court's conservative justices, whose ranks have recently been bolstered by the addition of Justice Neil Gorsuch to the high court.

Last August, the en banc Philadelphia-based 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals had upheld the federal law, the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act, in the consolidated New Jersey cases.

The NFL remains publicly opposed to legalized sports betting, but league owners recently approved the Oakland Raiders' proposed relocation to Las Vegas, one of the few venues that now allows for legal sports betting.

"Long time coming, today's SCOTUS announcement is welcome news to South Jersey residents who overwhelming voted to allow sports-betting", he wrote on Twitter.

Arizona, Louisiana, Mississippi, West Virginia and Wisconsin had joined New Jersey's effort to have the case heard by the Supreme Court.

"Rather than continuing to allow criminal and offshore entities to reap the benefits of illegal gaming, there is now an opportunity for the Supreme Court to allow the democratic process in New Jersey to appropriately regulate sports gaming", Pallone said in a statement.

  • Lawrence Cooper