Trump's fraud panel wants SC voter rolls

Trump's election integrity commission is requesting the publicly-available voter roll data for the state, including full names, addresses, dates of birth, the last four digits of Social Security numbers, elections voted in from 2006 on, any felony convictions, and information regarding military status, registration in other states and overseas information. "What are they trying to hide?"

Secretary of State Tom Schedler announced Monday that he based the decision on "a long-standing, consistent belief" that voter information should be protected by the states.

The office of Gov. Henry McMaster said the election commission should comply with the request as far as it is legally able to.

At least eight largely Democratic states said they would not comply at all and at least 16 other states have informed the commission that they would not provide any sensitive data.

Critics have accused Trump of forming the commission looking into possible voter fraud because he has said he lost the popular vote only because of illegal voting. Powell said of a Washington Post article that listed Arkansas among states that would "partially" comply: "Apparently, the Washington Post is drawing its own conclusions, as we have not spoken with them".

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A spokesperson for Arizona Secretary of State Michele Reagan told KTAR in an email she has not received the commission's letter.

Menzel said Ilinois law forbids the release of the requested Social Security information. "For Republican election administrators, this is a federalism issue".

More than 20 states, including Kentucky, California and NY, have declined to provide some or all of the information, saying it was unnecessary and violated privacy. Kobach has spent his public life attempting to suppress votes and has mounted some past dubious efforts to root out supposed fraudulent voters. Trump's Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, a Wisconsin native who previously served as the Republican National Committee chairman and chair of the Republican Party of Wisconsin, has always been a proponent of voter fraud theories. There is no other plausible use for this type of information.

"Being that Kobach is a the secretary of state, I'm baffled about the problem he has given his fellow secretaries of state", Perez said.

Frosh said he found the request "repugnant", and that "it appears designed only to intimidate voters and to indulge President Trump's fantasy that he won the popular vote".

  • Sonia Alvarado