Facebook wants to fight revenge porn by seeing your nudes

Facebook says the footprint technology does not allow the company to store the photos, according to the Washington Post.

If you're in Australia, Facebook wants your nude photographs, but it's not what you may be thinking.

As part of a new feature, users in Australia are being asked to upload explicit photos of themselves before they send them to anyone else.

Australian government's e-Safety Commissioner has launched a range of measures to counter image based abuse and revenge porn.

If you're anxious your intimate photos will end up on Instagram or Facebook, you can get in contact with Australi's e-Safety Commissioner.

The social media company is right now testing the new strategy in Australia where it is working in collaboration with the office of the e-Safety Commissioner to device methods so that revenge porn can be dealt with.

However, Facebook implemented new photo-matching technology in April to help address the problem in the U.S., Tech Crunch reported.

Samsung Galaxy Note 8 Models Facing Freezing Issues
Besides, Samsung's homeland South Korea is also among the favourable regions to get the update in the first wave of the rollout. It's tempting, especially given that we don't have an official release date for the Galaxy S8 Android Oreo update.


So, just in case a person's former lover decides to leak any of those pictures, one can take steps to prevent the images from being shared widely on Facebook or Instagram.

A recent study found that one in five Australians have been victims of revenge porn.

The technology has been designed for people who may be concerned that an ex-partner might post their intimate images to Facebook, Instagram or Messenger after the relationship has ended.

Facebook employees will only see a blurred version of the image, then they'll apply the "hash" to it before it is deleted. Well, share your nude photo first with Facebook. You send the nude to yourself in Messenger, and Facebook creates a hashed digital fingerprint of the photo - an encrypted version of the raw data in the image file. But, it still remains to be seen how confident users are in giving their intimate images and videos to Facebook, considering Facebook's bad reputation with regards to privacy and consumer trust.

Having proven itself capable of taking out Russian agents, Facebook is now rolling out a plan it promises will stop revenge porn. "They make you sign on to the service, and then they make you report one of three things".

By the way, "revenge porn" is a horrendous phrase.

  • Douglas Reid