Trump reponds to NY attack

President Donald Trump decried political correctness Wednesday in the wake of the New York City terror attack, claiming that the country is "so politically correct that we're afraid to do anything."We have to get much tougher".

The Trump administration has attempted since his inauguration in January to enforce his promise of a travel ban which would prevent people travelling to the United States from six Muslim majority countries - Iran, Syria, Libya, Sudan, Somalia and Yemen. The suspect came to the USA from the former Soviet Russia nation of Uzbekistan - a country not on Trump's travel ban list - in 2010.

Some experts, too, agreed with this viewpoint but said the measures taken by the USA under its sovereign right to improve its homeland security won't target a country such as India.

Officials said information about the incident was preliminary and said more information was to follow.

Trump also went after Sen. Schumer responded by calling on Trump to rescind proposed cuts to anti-terrorism funding, which would result from his most recent budget proposal.

Two House Panels Launch Investigation Into FBI's 2016 Decisions
Notably, Nunes did not mention Clinton's name Tuesday as he announced his investigation - instead, he, DeSantis and Rep. Clinton was not mentioned during the press conference as part of the Russian Federation investigation.


Trump vowed to begin the process of terminating the so-called Diversity Lottery Program of immigration. On Tuesday afternoon, the truck's driver turned onto the bike path, striking several people before plowing into a school bus, said the police.

"They say he came in through that program, so we'll see, we're looking at it", Trump replied.

Vetting procedures attempt to detect foreign nations who may commit or support acts of terrorism, or pose a threat to national security. But there is no such thing as a proper "Extreme Vetting Program".

The next 24 hours - and the 24 hours after that, etc. - were also not an appropriate time to discuss potential legislation to address the scourge of gun violence, which has claimed more United States lives than terrorism on American soil since 2001.

The ban's third iteration, which would have added Chad, North Korea and Venezuela to the list of banned countries and extended the ban's time limit indefinitely, was blocked by a Hawaii federal judge one day before it was to take effect on October 18. US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said that the order "was issued in order to protect Americans by addressing weaknesses in our visa program and refugee vetting system".

  • Sonia Alvarado