Rose McIver's 'so bad it's good' Christmas Prince movie has gone viral

The tweet resulted in reactions from a number of people who said they were scared about how Netflix monitored their viewing habits and probably created their profiles based on such viewing habits. All that matters is that it's another cheesy Christmas movie premise, only this time with royal douchery weaved ever-so-seamlessly throughout the plot.

Riffing on the film's bad press, which had spread to sites including Buzzfeed and Entertainment Weekly, Netflix exposed some of the film's biggest fans on Twitter yesterday, tweeting: "To the 53 people who've watched A Christmas Prince every day for the past 18 days: Who hurt you?" They expressed concern and asked for specifics about how many Netflix employees have access to user data. It's why automated recommendations work so well.

As such, whenever a user browses through a list of shows on Netflix and previews some of them, his/her viewing pattern is picked up by AI tools employed by Netflix wich then recommends new shows to the user.

So much for that.

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No, it isn't Saint Nick - it's Netflix, which is closing out 2017 with a Year In Review that reveals it knows an astonishing amount about your naughty and nice watching habits. It's also a peek behind the veil.

Though the tweet was supposed to be light-hearted in tone, some users considered it to be "creepy".

What's not clear is how protected members' viewing histories are within Netflix itself.

As part of its year-end report, Netflix recently reported the company streamed more than a billion hours of content per week to customers. The tweet's a joke, but not a very amusing one if you consider what could easily lie ahead for consumers online: less privacy and more powerful corporations.

  • Darren Santiago