Siri Bug Lets Strangers Hear Your Messages

That setting is on by default on the iPhone X, where simply glancing at it will unlock the phone and allow the content to be displayed, while it can be set on other models.

On iOS 11, Apple introduced a new way to protect user privacy by letting you hide the contents of your notifications on your iPhone's lock screen until you unlock the device with Touch ID or Face ID.

For those learning about this bug for the first time, basically even if you choose to disable previews in notifications, users can ask Siri to read their notifications out in which even those that are supposed to be hidden will be revealed. That apart, a new bug discovered by Mac Magazine seems to be the most notorious one. According to Mac Magazine, the issue exists in iOS 11.3, the latest version of Apple's mobile OS, which is on the verge of public release.

The bug was discovered this week, with the command "read my notifications" yielding some surprising results for owners of Apple's flagship devices. Siri bypassing the iPhone's lock and hidden notification setting is of major concern as users might have personal and confidential information on their WhatsApp, Gmail or even Slack. However a recent Siri bug circumvented that protection.

Apple iPhone X UK release
APPLEApple's iPhone X allows users to send Animojis

Interestingly, the bug does not work for Apple's native messaging app, meaning your iMessages are safe.

Test the bug for yourself: Go to Settings Notifications Select an app (say WhatsApp) Show Previews Select "When Unlocked". The update might come in iOS 11.3, now still in beta, or possibly in iOS 11.2.7 if Apple releases a minor update.

In a statement given to MacRumours, Apple said: "We are aware of the issue and it will be addressed in an upcoming software update".

African countries sign deal for free trade blocs
Analysts say that if the deal is signed by all member-states, the united African market may reach a combined GDP of $2.2 trillion. Governments now have the next six months, by September this year, to ratify the protocol.


  • Delia Davidson