Google to shut down Google

Google deliberately avoided disclosing the problem at the time, in part to avoid drawing regulatory scrutiny and damaging its reputation, according to a Wall Street Journal story that cited anonymous individuals and documents.

Google has made a decision to shut down its social media website Google+ after a massive data breach which potentially exposed data of over 500,000 users.

According to the blog post, the Google Plus data that was potentially exposed included names, email addresses, occupations, date of birth, profile photos and genders.

The project launched in 2011 as an alternative to other social networks ended up being a huge failure for the company.

An email shared among senior Google executives and lawyers said that revealing the issue would lead to "immediate regulatory interest" and mean its chief executive Sundar Pichai being forced to give evidence in Washington. The company has found no evidence that Profile data was misused.

"None of these thresholds were met in this instance", it said.

Google said it's pulling the plug on its unpopular Google+ social network after admitting to a software bug that exposed the personal information of as many as 500,000 users.

Google+ Is Shutting Down Following Security Breach
The Google Plus data potentially exposed includes names, email addresses, occupations, dates of birth, genders and profile photos. The service will be wound down over the next 10 months, with the ultimate shut-down coming in August 2019.


Google is at the centre of controversy this morning over a report of a massive user data breach that occurred previous year, with the result that they will be introducing finer grain controls to limit access to user data on the web and Android - and also shutdown Google+ for consumers.

Many people probably aren't aware if they even have a Google+ account - here's how to check. The company, however, can not confirm which users were affected by the bug when it was active from 2015 to 2018.

So the company felt that the site simply wasn't worth maintaining between its minimal traffic and its security threats, hence the ten-month period for users to migrate whatever data they need before it's taken offline in August 2019.

The API flaw allowed third-party app developers to access profile and contact information that chose to sign into the apps via Google. To make sure something like this Google+ leak doesn't happen again, this new initiative is set out to protect user's privacy and limit the amount of data developers have access to across the web and Android.

Google is also making some changes to its Gmail API and is limiting Android apps that request to receive Call Log and SMS permissions.

Besides low usage, Google+ engagement rates are also defeating, with 90-percent of all sessions lasting for under five seconds, according to Alphabet's subsidiary.

  • Delia Davidson