Samsung’s first 7-nanometer EUV processor will power the Galaxy note 10

The new chip, which is likely to power global variants of the Galaxy Note 10 (the USA versions will probably be powered by the Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 chip), is Samsung's first to be built in 7nm technology, which should provide for better power efficiency compared to its predecessor, the 8nm Exynos 9820.

Along with its first foldable phone, the big-screen Note 10, unveiled at an event in NY on Wednesday, is the South Korean tech giant's most important new product planned in the second half of this year to expand its mobile sales. It comprises an octa-core CPU, an ARM Mali-G76 MP12 GPU, and the previously mentioned NPU.

According to Samsung, the Exynos 9825's NPU was designed for the next generation of mobile experiences, from AI-powered photography to augmented reality. The SoC is also ready to work with Samsung's Exynos Modem 5100 to offer 5G support.

Beside its 7nm die lithography, the Exynos 9825 is practically identical to Samsung's earlier Exynos 9820 SoC that's used in the Galaxy 10 series. Officially, the chipset can support a 16MP + 16MP dual configuration or a single 22MP primary sensor for the main camera. On the video side of things, the processor is capable of encoding and decoding 8K UHD video. It also supports 4K UHD displays (4096 x 2160) and WQUXGA displays (3840 x 2400).

Report finds Apple routinely favors its own apps in App Store searches
Similarly, Apple tells developers that search results on the App Store are influenced by downloads, user reviews, and ratings. After being accused of skirting some of its own rules for search results rankings, Apple has fired back.


Now that the Galaxy Active Watch 2 and Galaxy Tab S6 have been announced, the focus of the event will be squarely on the Note 10.

Samsung also promises this new chipset will improve the smartphone's graphics performance, as well as bringing new AI camera features for better shots.

Its first foldable phone, the Galaxy Fold, is set to go on sale from September, but analysts say headlines about glitches with sample Folds will dampen consumer excitement around the launch.

  • Delia Davidson